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Juli 23

Juli 22

thisisfusion:

Nearly one in every 100 adults in America is in prison or jail.

Or, as John Oliver so helpfully points out, America has more prisoners at the moment than China. And we don’t have more of anything than China, ‘other than, of course, debt to China.’

Overcrowding in America’s prisons has become so pervasive that Sesame Street is now stepping in to explain just how we got here (2:30 minute mark)

"And of course, it’s tricky to know how to feel about all this because on the one hand, the war on drugs has completely solved our nation’s drug problem. So that’s good," Oliver jokes. "But on the other hand, our drug laws do seem to be a little draconian and a lot racist."

And Oliver isn’t wrong.

Drug offenders make up a shocking amount of prisoners in America’s penitentiary system.

Drug offenders account for more inmates than those being held on immigration-related charges, The Huffington Post reports:

"People convicted of two broad categories of nonviolent crimes — drugs and immigration — make up over 60 percent of the U.S. prison population,” The Huffington Post reported in March.”

No wonder we need John Oliver and Sesame Street to explain this system to us.


Juli 20
thepeoplesrecord:

Gaza, a poemBy Nisha Bolsey
I’m walking and a man says, “If the Palestinians would just love their children more than they hate their enemy, the violence would be over.”Yes.If only.If only they would love their children.If only they had chosen the four corners(so they would die)or kept them in the middle(so they would die).If only they would have brought four-day old Noura back to life.If only they would kiss their children’s dead mouths and breathe life into them.If only they would raise their arms to the sun to block the bombs with the palms of their hands.If only they would dry the rivers of blood in the streets and pour them back into the hearts of their daughters and sons.Why don’t they?Why can’t they just pull out their own lungs and stick them into their slaughtered children’s chests?Why can’t they just sing, 24 hours a day, louder than thunder, to prevent their ears from hearing the sound of bombs?If only they would love their children, and carry their bodies up into the air, above the siege, past the blockade, into freedom.If the Al-Batsh boys’ parents had really loved them,they wouldn’t have let their insides be wrenched apart by the bomb that fell.They would use their hands to hold their limbs together so that they could stay in one piece.If only they would stop the vibrations which create sound,the sound which crashes and bleeds through their children’s ears.If only they would stop all light from traveling, so that their children wouldn’t have to see their sisters, cousins, fathers, brothers.Dead on the floor.Their house turning to rubble.Their family turning to dust.Their family turning to nothing.Their world disappearing.And why doesn’t their love sustain their children more than food?Heal the wounds from the weapons?They had seconds to leave before the bombing began.They should have thrown their children out the window,knowing they would take flightwith the wings their love had created.If only they loved Mohammed, Ahed, Zakaria and Mohammedenoughto rise above their soccer game and changethe magnetic forces of the Earth,to pull away the bomb,headed for the beach.

thepeoplesrecord:

Gaza, a poem
By Nisha Bolsey

I’m walking and a man says, “If the Palestinians would just love their children more than they hate their enemy, the violence would be over.”
Yes.
If only.
If only they would love their children.
If only they had chosen the four corners
(so they would die)
or kept them in the middle
(so they would die).
If only they would have brought four-day old Noura back to life.
If only they would kiss their children’s dead mouths and breathe life into them.
If only they would raise their arms to the sun to block the bombs with the palms of their hands.
If only they would dry the rivers of blood in the streets and pour them back into the hearts of their daughters and sons.
Why don’t they?
Why can’t they just pull out their own lungs and stick them into their slaughtered children’s chests?
Why can’t they just sing, 24 hours a day, louder than thunder, to prevent their ears from hearing the sound of bombs?
If only they would love their children, and carry their bodies up into the air, above the siege, past the blockade, into freedom.
If the Al-Batsh boys’ parents had really loved them,
they wouldn’t have let their insides be wrenched apart by the bomb that fell.
They would use their hands to hold their limbs together so that they could stay in one piece.
If only they would stop the vibrations which create sound,
the sound which crashes and bleeds through their children’s ears.
If only they would stop all light from traveling, so that their children wouldn’t have to see their sisters, cousins, fathers, brothers.
Dead on the floor.
Their house turning to rubble.
Their family turning to dust.
Their family turning to nothing.
Their world disappearing.
And why doesn’t their love sustain their children more than food?
Heal the wounds from the weapons?
They had seconds to leave before the bombing began.
They should have thrown their children out the window,
knowing they would take flight
with the wings their love had created.
If only they loved Mohammed, Ahed, Zakaria and Mohammed
enough
to rise above their soccer game and change
the magnetic forces of the Earth,
to pull away the bomb,
headed for the beach.


Jehad Saftawi, IMEU:

"On July 16, while I was in eastern Gaza City taking photos of the many buildings recently destroyed by Israeli forces, a man approached me and asked if I wanted to enter his home to take photos of the inside.

I accepted his offer and as he showed me around, I learned his name is Khamis Mraish and that his brother, Dr. Riad Mraish, ran a clinic from the home.  As Khamis took me through each corner of the house, he described in detail the damage in every room. Most of the family’s belongings, including Dr. Mraish’s medical equipment, were now ruined, scattered in pieces and covered with debris.

It was horribly sad to witness his pain — and how he so badly wanted to share his story with the world. And the more people I speak with, the more I realize there is this same feeling everywhere. The people in Gaza want, and need, the world to see what they are going through.”

(via fotojournalismus)


fotojournalismus:

A father comforts his daughter, whom medics said was injured by an explosion during an overnight Israeli assault, as she is treated for her injuries at Shifa hospital in Gaza City on July 18, 2014. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

fotojournalismus:

A father comforts his daughter, whom medics said was injured by an explosion during an overnight Israeli assault, as she is treated for her injuries at Shifa hospital in Gaza City on July 18, 2014. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)


fotojournalismus:

Women and children huddle outside after an Israeli air raid on their house in Gaza City on July 18, 2014. (Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto)

fotojournalismus:

Women and children huddle outside after an Israeli air raid on their house in Gaza City on July 18, 2014. (Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto)


fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian inspects the destroyed home belonging to the Inteiz family after Israeli air strikes in Al Shejaeiya on July 18, 2014. Three members of the Inteiz family, Abd Ali Inteiz, 23, Mohammed Salem Inteiz, 2, and Mohammed Ibrahim Inteiz, 12, were killed after Israeli tanks shelled their home. (Mohammed Saber/EPA)

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian inspects the destroyed home belonging to the Inteiz family after Israeli air strikes in Al Shejaeiya on July 18, 2014. Three members of the Inteiz family, Abd Ali Inteiz, 23, Mohammed Salem Inteiz, 2, and Mohammed Ibrahim Inteiz, 12, were killed after Israeli tanks shelled their home. (Mohammed Saber/EPA)


fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian medic is overwhelmed by emotion as he takes a break treating wounded people by Israeli strikes, at the emergency room of the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahiya on July 19, 2014. According to the hospital, there were more than 35 wounded Palestinians from different Israeli strikes that arrived at the hospital Saturday — five with serious wounds, and three were dead on arrival. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian medic is overwhelmed by emotion as he takes a break treating wounded people by Israeli strikes, at the emergency room of the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahiya on July 19, 2014. According to the hospital, there were more than 35 wounded Palestinians from different Israeli strikes that arrived at the hospital Saturday — five with serious wounds, and three were dead on arrival. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)


“There are no spaces for life. No place to return. All of Gaza bids farewell to herself every night and congratulates those who remain alive the morning of another day. They inspect their bodies then run their hands over the living. They close their eyes then open them, and once again call the members of their families one by one…so that the memory of their names does not fail and their spirits do not disappear.” Hedaya Shamun, “I Do Not Wish For You To See Gaza As Anything But a Rose" (translated by Ghada Mourad and Tyson Patros)

(via fotojournalismus)


fotojournalismus:

Palestinians walk past a damaged car as they return to their house after filling containers with water from a public tap in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on July 19, 2014. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

fotojournalismus:

Palestinians walk past a damaged car as they return to their house after filling containers with water from a public tap in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on July 19, 2014. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)


Juli 16

fotojournalismus:

Donkeys looking for food from garbage on the beachfront in Deir El Baleh, central Gaza Strip on July 14, 2014. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)


fotojournalismus:

An Indian farmer pushes his bicycle past a parched paddy field in Ranbir Singh Pura, India on July 15, 2014. (Channi Anand/AP)

fotojournalismus:

An Indian farmer pushes his bicycle past a parched paddy field in Ranbir Singh Pura, India on July 15, 2014. (Channi Anand/AP)


fotojournalismus:

Scars show as Gaza’s children endure third war (via AP)

The children of the Attar clan have lived through three wars in just over five years, each time fleeing their homes as Israel bombarded their neighbourhood in the Palestinian Gaza Strip.

They live in Atatra, a neighbourhood in northeastern Gaza, just a few hundred meters from Israel. Residents of Atatra fled their homes in Israel’s three-week military offensive in the winter of 2008-2009, during a week of cross-border fighting in November 2012 and again over the weekend.

After Israeli aircraft dropped leaflets over Atatra on Saturday warning residents to leave, sisters Mariam and Sada Attar bundled a few belongings into plastic bags and rushed out of their homes. They had 10 children in tow, as well as Mariam’s husband Omar, who she said suffers from stress-induced psychological disorders and can no longer function normally.

Their psychological scars show. Some act out, others cling to their mothers or withdraw, like 12-year-old Ahmed who sat by himself on a bench in the courtyard of a U.N. school where his family once again sought shelter.

"They bombed very close to my house," said the boy, looking down and avoiding eye contact. "I’m scared."

Experts said it will be increasingly difficult to heal such victims of repeated trauma.

"For the majority of the children (in Gaza), it is the third time around," said Bruce Grant, the chief of child protection for the Palestinian territories in the United Nation’s children’s agency, UNICEF. "It reduces their ability to be resilient and to bounce back. Some will not find their way back to a sense of normalcy. Fear will become their new norm."

The families sought shelter in the same U.N. school where they stayed during the previous two rounds of fighting. In all, 20 U.N. schools took in more than 17,000 displaced Gazans, many of them children, after Saturday’s warnings by Israel that civilians must clear out of northern Gaza.

Members of the Attar clan took over part of the second floor, with more than 40 people sleeping in each classroom. Mariam, Sada, Omar and the children were squeezed into one half of a room, their space demarcated by benches. Another family from the clan stayed in the other half of the room. A blanket draped across an open doorway offered the only measure of privacy.

In the classroom, the scene was chaotic, with children pushing and shoving each other and mothers yelling at them to behave. There was nothing to do for children or grown-ups, except to wait.

Mariam Attar, 35, said they spent the night on the hard floor for lack of mattresses.

She sat on the floor, her back leaning against a wall, and held her youngest, 16-month-old Mahmoud. She said her older children have become clingy, some asking that she accompany them to the communal toilet.

Recalling the latest bombings, she said: “We felt the house was going to fall on top of us and so the children started to scream. I was screaming and my husband was screaming.”

Her 14-year-old son Mohammed said the family cowered on the ground in the living room during the bombing to avoid being hit by shrapnel. He said the time passed slowly because they had no electricity or TV.

Mohammed and Ahmed, who is from another branch of the clan, said they and other children often play “Arabs and Jews,” fighting each other with toy guns or wooden sticks as make-believe weapons. Arabs always win, the boys said.

Rasem Shamiya, a counselor who works for the U.N. school system, said many of the children show signs of trauma, including trouble paying attention, aggressive behavior or avoiding contact with others. “They are very stressed,” he said. “Since these children were born, they have never known peace.”

According to figures released by the United Nations’ Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), 80 percent of the fatalities caused by Israeli air strikes in the Gaza Strip have been civilians. More than 20 percent were children. The organization also estimates 25,300 children are in need of psychosocial support.

The children’s fears are very real and parents in Gaza are increasingly unable to reassure them, said Pierre Krahenbuhl, who heads the U.N. agency that provides aid to Palestinian refugees.

"Today, we met with families who shared with us that they have simply no more answers to give when the children ask them why are the homes shaking, why is there so much destruction," he said.

Sada Attar, 43, said she worries her children and others in that generation will come to see violence as normal.

"These disturbed children are not going to be good for Israel’s long term interests," she said. "The child will naturally rise up and confront the Zionist enemy with the stone, with fire, with everything in their power."

Photos taken by Associated Press photographer Khalil Hamra on July 14, 2014 at the New Gaza Boys United Nations school, where dozens of families have sought refuge after fleeing their home in fear of Israeli airstrikes.


Juli 14

thisisfusion:

All children are not treated equally in the U.S., including children from different countries migrating into the country.

There’s a big difference between how Mexican and Central American kids are treated once they cross the border.

Mexican children and teens are deported almost immediately, without ever setting foot in court to argue their case for legal status. Their quick ouster is known as “expedited repatriation.”

Central American children, however, are allowed to remain in the country until they go before a judge.

Lawmakers from Texas are now discussing plans for new legislation aimed at removing Central American kids in a similarly expedited fashionContinue reading.

(via califasqueen)


Juli 11

fotojournalismus:

Israel/Palestine

"I’ve really tried to understand the Israelis. I used to work on a farm in Israel. I speak Hebrew. I watch their news. All the time they talk about fear. How they have to run to their bunkers to hide from the rockets. How their children can’t sleep because of the sirens. This is not a good way for them to live.

We Palestinians don’t talk about fear, we talk about death. Our rockets scare them; their rockets kill us. We have no bomb shelters, we have no sirens, we have nowhere we can take our children and keep them safe. They are scared. We are dying.” — Mohammed al-Khoudry, a Palestinian farmer, said in 2012.

According to Gaza’s Ministry of Health, 98 Palestinians have been killed so far and over 600 injured in Israel’s assault on the besieged coastal enclave. In the deadliest single attack since the offensive began, at least seven Palestinian civilians, including five children, were killed when Israeli warplanes bombed several homes in a densely populated area where the victims were sleeping. Bodies were pulled from the rubble of at least three homes and neighbouring buildings. (x)

A Palestinian journalist was killed in central Gaza after his car was bombed. Video footage shows it had been marked as a media vehicle. The Israeli military says it has dropped 800 tonnes of bombs on 750 targets throughout Gaza, more than during its eight-day assault in late 2012. Hospitals in Gaza have been overwhelmed with victims and are running low on basic supplies. Egypt has opened up the Rafah border crossing to evacuate some of the wounded. (x)

All the pictures above were taken on July 10, 2014. Pictures on the left are from Israel and pictures on the right are from the Gaza Strip.

See the captions below:

First row:

1. Commuters wait for a bus in central Tel Aviv. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

2. Palestinians standing behind the gate of Rafah crossing hold their passports as they try to cross into Egypt. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

Second row: 

1. Israelis take cover in an underground car park in Tel Aviv during a rocket attack by Palestinian militants from the nearby Gaza Strip. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Palestinian mourners carry the body of five-year-old boy Abdallah Abu Ghazal during his funeral in Beit Lahiya after he was killed in an Israeli air strike. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

Third row:

1. A woman takes a photo with her mobile phone of a car damaged when the remains of a rocket intercepted by Israel landed in a Tel Aviv neighbourhood. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

2. Palestinians search in the rubble of a destroyed house where eight members of the Al Haj family were killed in a strike early morning in Khan Younis refugee camp. (AP)

Fourth row:

1. Israeli soldiers ride on a tank to a position near Israel Gaza Border. (Ariel Schalit/AP)

2. Palestinian mourners chant slogans as they carry the bodies of eight members of the Al Haj family, who were killed in an Israeli missile strike early morning, during their funeral in Khan Younis refugee camp. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

Fifth row: 

1. Israelis take cover as siren sounds during rocket attack fired by Palestinians militants from Gaza in Tel Aviv. (Dan Balilty/AP)

2. Palestinian relatives of eight members of the Al Haj family, who were killed in a strike early morning, grieve in the family house during their funeral in Khan Younis refugee camp. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)


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