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Einträge getaggt mit protests

Aug. 13
fotojournalismus:

Brazilian activist against the Hidroeletric Plant of Belo Monte, which is being built in Amazonia - Brasil. On the back side, the Theater of Sao Paulo - Brazil  
Photo By: Rodrigo Cruz

fotojournalismus:

Brazilian activist against the Hidroeletric Plant of Belo Monte, which is being built in Amazonia - Brasil. 
On the back side, the Theater of Sao Paulo - Brazil  

Photo By: Rodrigo Cruz


Aug. 10

Olympic Flashback: Mexico City 1968

On the eve of the 1968 Olympics, Mexican soldiers opened fire on a peaceful student protest, killing hundreds in a massacre long shrouded in secrecy.

The story is told by Mexico’s famed author and diplomat Carlos Fuentes — who died this year — and Harry Edwards, the sports activist and scholar who organized a boycott of the Olympics by black American athletes in 1968.

This excerpt was taken from the PBS documentary, “The Sixties: The Years that Shaped a Generation” (2005) by filmmakers David Davis and Stephen Talbot.

(via thinkmexican)



Mexico ’68: A Movement, A Massacre, and the 40-Year Search for the Truth
In the summer of 1968, students in Mexico began to challenge the country’s authoritarian government. But the movement was short-lived, lasting less than three months. It ended October 2, 1968, ten days before the opening of the Olympics in Mexico City, when military troops opened fire on a peaceful student demonstration.
The shooting lasted over two hours. The next day the government sent in cleaners to wash the blood from the plaza floor. The official announcement was that four students were dead, but eyewitnesses said hundreds were killed. The death toll was not the only thing the government covered up.
The Massacre of Tlatelolco has become a defining moment in Mexican history, but for forty years the truth of that day has remained hidden.
Learn more about the 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre

Mexico ’68: A Movement, A Massacre, and the 40-Year Search for the Truth

In the summer of 1968, students in Mexico began to challenge the country’s authoritarian government. But the movement was short-lived, lasting less than three months. It ended October 2, 1968, ten days before the opening of the Olympics in Mexico City, when military troops opened fire on a peaceful student demonstration.

The shooting lasted over two hours. The next day the government sent in cleaners to wash the blood from the plaza floor. The official announcement was that four students were dead, but eyewitnesses said hundreds were killed. The death toll was not the only thing the government covered up.

The Massacre of Tlatelolco has become a defining moment in Mexican history, but for forty years the truth of that day has remained hidden.

Learn more about the 1968 Tlatelolco Massacre

(via thinkmexican)


Juli 13

Foreign activists and Palestinians dressed as clowns demonstrate in front of Israeli soldiers during a protest against Israel’s controversial separation barrier in the West Bank village of Maasarah near Bethlehem on July 13, 2012. AFP PHOTO/MUSA AL-SHAER and  Ahmad Mezher .

(via socialuprooting)


Juli 11

July 7 2012. A quick shoot of what happened in a big march against imposition in México. 

Un panorama de lo que sucedió el pasado 7 de julio en la ciudad de Puebla México.


Juli 8


Thousands of protesters marched through the Mexican capital on Saturday, July 7 against President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto, accusing him of buying votes and paying off TV networks for support.

Thousands of protesters marched through the Mexican capital on Saturday, July 7 against President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto, accusing him of buying votes and paying off TV networks for support.

(via thepeoplesrecord)



Anonymous hackers pick up litter in Tokyo protestJuly 8, 2012

Allies of global hacker group Anonymous have put on their masks and picked up litter in a Tokyo park as a protest against tough illegal download laws.

The 80-strong collective said yesterday’s protest was against Japan’s tougher laws against illegal downloads.
In light rain, they took part in an “anonymous cleaning service” for one hour in a park and on pavements in the shopping and entertainment hub of Shibuya, a change from the group’s trademark website attacks.
They were dressed in black and wore masks of Guy Fawkes, the central figure in England’s 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up parliament, which have become a symbol of protests by the loosely linked alliance around the world.
Last month, Japan’s parliament enacted new copyright laws that could mean jail for anyone illegally downloading copyrighted music and movies.
On June 26, websites of the Japanese finance ministry, the Supreme Court and other public offices were defaced or brought down after an Anonymous online statement denounced the new laws.
The statement claimed Japan’s recording industry and other content providers were now pushing internet service providers to implement surveillance technology that will spy on every single Internet user in Japan.
The group, which assembled for the clean-up service in Tokyo, attributed the cyber attacks to other Anonymous elements around the world.
“We prefer constructive and productive solutions,” the group said in a statement. “We want to make our fellow citizens aware of the problem with a productive message.”
Source

Anonymous hackers pick up litter in Tokyo protest
July 8, 2012

Allies of global hacker group Anonymous have put on their masks and picked up litter in a Tokyo park as a protest against tough illegal download laws.

The 80-strong collective said yesterday’s protest was against Japan’s tougher laws against illegal downloads.

In light rain, they took part in an “anonymous cleaning service” for one hour in a park and on pavements in the shopping and entertainment hub of Shibuya, a change from the group’s trademark website attacks.

They were dressed in black and wore masks of Guy Fawkes, the central figure in England’s 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up parliament, which have become a symbol of protests by the loosely linked alliance around the world.

Last month, Japan’s parliament enacted new copyright laws that could mean jail for anyone illegally downloading copyrighted music and movies.

On June 26, websites of the Japanese finance ministry, the Supreme Court and other public offices were defaced or brought down after an Anonymous online statement denounced the new laws.

The statement claimed Japan’s recording industry and other content providers were now pushing internet service providers to implement surveillance technology that will spy on every single Internet user in Japan.

The group, which assembled for the clean-up service in Tokyo, attributed the cyber attacks to other Anonymous elements around the world.

“We prefer constructive and productive solutions,” the group said in a statement. “We want to make our fellow citizens aware of the problem with a productive message.”

Source


März 6

Palestinian Muslim men pray during a protest against the relocation of an Israeli road gate in the village of Beit Iksa in the occupied West Bank, between Ramallah and Jerusalem, on March 6, 2012. A recent decision by Israel to build the illegal separation barrier between Beit Iksa and Jerusalem has effectively put the village under Israeli occupation, isolating it from other nearby Palestinian towns. (Getty Images)

(via fotojournalismus)


Student General Strike in Quebec: 150,000 could be on strike as early as this afternoon

Concordia University’s 40,000 students could join the province of Quebec’s general student strike already in progress, with a general assembly and vote of the undergraduate Concordia Student Union scheduled for this afternoon (March 6). The vote, which is expected to pass, will speak for the entire student body. Many specific student departments, such as Political Science, Fine Arts, Philosophy and the Simone de Beauvoir Women’s Studies Institute have already voted to start striking individually.

The provincial government plans to increase tuition by $1,625 in total, over the next five years, raising current fees from $2,200 to $3,800 for in-province students, and much more for out-of-province and international students. While Quebec has the lowest tuition rate of any province in Canada, the province also has the highest taxes by far, as well as a somewhat low minimum wage in comparison with that of other expensive provinces like British Columbia and Ontario. Students argue that education is not a commodity, and shifting the financial burden for education to individual user fees would force students out of classes and dramatically increase inequality in an already fractured society.

If Concordia joins the student strike this week, that will bring nearly 150,000 students in Quebec on general strike against the government’s proposed fee hikes.

(photos courtesy The Link and CBC)

(via socialuprooting)


Febr. 23

Febr. 21

Pictured: Protesters Outside of Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan

Protests rage outside of Bagram Air Base, after reports that recent trash burnings inside the camp included several copies of the Koran. An anonymous source claimed that the destroyed copies contained coded messages for terrorists; however, no proof was offered to back the claims. After protesters began lobbing stones and petrol bombs at the base, soldiers peppered the crowd with non-lethal rounds from a nearby watchtower.

(images courtesy of Musadeq Sadeq, Shah Marai, AP, AFP, Getty Images)

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(via semasahin-deactivated20120804)


Febr. 20

Police arrest an anti-government protestor during clashes in Senegal’s capital Dakar, February 19, 2012. Senegal security forces fired teargas and rubber bullets at hundreds of rock-throwing protesters in the capital on Sunday in the fifth straight day of demonstrations against President Abdoulaye Wade’s candidacy in a February 26 election.
[Credit : Joe Penney/Reuters]

Police arrest an anti-government protestor during clashes in Senegal’s capital Dakar, February 19, 2012. Senegal security forces fired teargas and rubber bullets at hundreds of rock-throwing protesters in the capital on Sunday in the fifth straight day of demonstrations against President Abdoulaye Wade’s candidacy in a February 26 election.

[Credit : Joe Penney/Reuters]

(via fotojournalismus)


Febr. 1

Senegal: Four Die in Anti-Wade Protests

A man in his thirties became the latest victim when he died in hospital on Tuesday, according to reports from Suma Assistance, the medical facility where he was being treated. He was injured when a police vehicle drove into a crowd. Police has since denied responsibility for the death of the young man.

The demonstration started at about 3pm and by 7pm the crowd, made up mostly of people of voting age, was already leaving. But at about 7:20pm a crowd of determined youths tried to make their way to the presidential palace. When they were met by heavily-armed troops, there was an exchange of stones and teargas and a young coffee seller was shot in the leg.

A radio broadcast from the scene reported that presidential candidates Moustapha Niass from Coalition Bennoo Sigguil Senegal (Union For the Reformation of Senegal), Ousmane Tanor Dieng and Cheikh Bamba Dièye were beaten by police.

On Monday, two people were killed in Podor, 490km from Dakar, after a shooting by police officers during a protest organised by Mouvement Y’En A Marre, a movement which is opposed to Wade’s candidature. On January 27, a young police officer succumbed to injuries sustained in the demonstration that followed the Constitutional Court’s validation of Wade running for another term as president.

Video from  



December 4th, 2011, in Cajamarca, Peru, people protested against U.S.-based Newmont Mining Corporation’s new mining project in Cajamarca. 
(AP Photo)

December 4th, 2011, in Cajamarca, Peru, people protested against U.S.-based Newmont Mining Corporation’s new mining project in Cajamarca

(AP Photo)


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